NBN Connection Types

The seven different nbn technologies, see them below:

Fibre To The Premise (FTTP)
An nbn™ Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) connection is used in circumstances where a fibre optic line will be run from the nearest available fibre node, directly to your premises. The best type of nbn available. Max speed is 100/40 mbit, although capable of 1000/400 mbit, hopefully the nbn wholesale pricing model will change and enable this speed to everyone. FTTP is not affected by distance. Technology used is called Gigabit Passive Optical Networks (GPON).

Fibre To The Node (FTTN)
An nbn™ Fibre to the Node (FTTN) connection is utilised where the existing copper phone and internet network from a nearby fibre node is used to make the final part of the connection to the nbn™ access network. The fibre node is likely to take the form of a street cabinet. Each street cabinet will allow the nbn™ access network signal to travel over a fibre optic line from the exchange, to the cabinet, and connect with the existing copper network to reach your premises. Maximum speed on FTTN is 100/40 mbit, depending on the length and quality of the copper. Speeds drop off after 450 metres from the node, if the copper is degraded then it would be shorter. Technology used is called VDSL.

Fibre To The Basement (FTTB)
An nbn™ Fibre to the Building (FTTB) connection is generally used when we are connecting an apartment block or similar types of buildings to the nbn™ access network. In this scenario we run a fibre optic line to the fibre node in the building’s communications room, and then we use the existing technology in the building to connect to each apartment. The fibre node is likely to take the form of a secure cabinet in your building’s communications room. Each cabinet will allow the nbn™ access network signal to travel over a fibre optic line, to the existing network technology present in the building. The same as FTTN, however the node is in your basement, so you have a pretty short cable run, meaning, in most cases you will be able to reach close to 100/40 mbit speeds. This effect by the quality of the copper. Technology used is VDSL.

Fibre To The Curb (FTTC)
An nbn™ FTTC connection is used in circumstances where fibre is extended close to your premises, connecting to a small Distribution Point Unit (DPU), generally located inside a pit on the street. From here, the existing copper network is connected to the fibre to form the final nbn™ connection. To power your FTTC service with electricity and provide your connection to the nbn™ broadband access network, an FTTC nbn™ connection box will be required inside your home or business. nbn™ is currently recently released this technology, the maximum speed is still going to be 100/40 mbit as its essentially the same as FTTN (VDSL). The only difference between it is the copper run will be shorter so you have more likelyhood of not being effected by distance as FTTN is.

Hybrid Fibre Coaxial (HFC)
An nbn™ Hybrid Fibre Coaxial (HFC) connection is used in circumstances where the existing ‘pay TV’ or cable network can be used to make the final part of the nbn™ access network connection. In this circumstance an HFC line will be run from the nearest available fibre node, to your premises. HFC replaces what was previously known as Optus or Telstra Cable. Maximum speed is 100/40 mbit. A splitter is used to enable the continuation of Foxtel services.

Fixed Wireless (FW)
An nbn™ Fixed Wireless connection utilises data transmitted over radio signals to connect a premises to the nbn™ broadband access network. This connection is typically used in circumstances where the distance between premises can be many kilometres. Data travels from a transmission tower located as far as 14 kilometres, to an nbn™ outdoor antenna that has been fitted to the premises by an approved nbn™ installer. Maximum speeds are 50/20 mbit. An antenna is installed on to your roof which points towards a tower. The antenna has a network cable running down to an nbn connection box which is installed inside your residence. You will connect your wifi router to the  nbn™ connection box. Fixed Wireless signals are hinded by trees, structures and distance. Technology used is 4G.

Satellite (S)
The Sky Muster™ satellite service delivers the nbn™ broadband access network to homes and businesses in regional and remote Australia, via two state-of-the-art satellites. So, people across mainland Australia and Tasmania, and remote islands such as Norfolk Island, Christmas Island, Lord Howe Island and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands can now enjoy nbn™ powered plans through Sky Muster™ satellite providers. As well as the roof satellite dish installed on the home or business, Sky Muster™ satellite connections also require an nbn™ supplied modem to be installed at the point where the cable from the satellite dish enters the premises. Maximum speeds are 25/5 mbit. Satellite dish is installed on to your roof which points towards the sky. The dish has a network cable running down to an nbn connection box which is installed inside your residence. You will connect your wifi router to the nbn connection box. Satellite signals are effected by distance so there is high latency. Providers also have much lower data limits.